The Breeding African

Siboniso Mawandla | The Republic Mail

We cannot continue to bring children into this world, under the inhumane extreme conditions, blacks live under. Why birth an unnecessary number of children into poverty? For example, when one watches shows like Khumbulekhaya, these extremely shattered and broken black families, specialise in breeding, writes Sane Sunyshine Sihiya. 

The days of Idi Amin dictatorship are of course gone and only remain in history. We live in an era, where we shall not dictate to any being how their lives and lifestyles should be lived nor expressed. It’s called liberty. However, there are certain issues, aspects that unravel as anti-progressive, particularly towards the true emancipation of the black man.  These issues certainly present themselves as a hindrance, hence they ought to be engaged.

We need to address the prevalence, unproductively so, of the breeding African. There has been a common, popular theme, which the social scientists, through research, have compiled. And that is, the association of poverty and breeding. It is a fact that, the highly impoverished and deprived, those that have been historically marginalised from resources by the system, tend to breed the most.

At the risk of prescribing prerogative, we have to question this unbecoming pattern. The point is, it is rather a bit problematic, if not absolutely problematic.

We cannot continue to bring children into this world, under the inhumane extreme conditions, blacks live under. Why birth an unnecessary number of children into poverty? For example, when one watches shows like Khumbulekhaya, these extremely shattered and broken black families, specialise in breeding.

These people live in shacks, most of them unemployed or working for wages under terrible conditions, yet they do not fail to breed! Why are they breeding? Surely, there has to be some form of irresponsibility associated with such behaviour!  Though, the concept of ‘responsibility’ is not a simple, straight forward one. It is complicated because, it must be contextualised.

However, it is ok to be ‘irresponsible’ to yourself! That is, engage in certain lifestyles that only directly, affect you. But if your irresponsibility then affects and trickles down upon another, it then becomes a problem. One needs to consider the environment and the future of these children. Why bring a life into this world, only to expose it to suffering and poverty?  Why are Africans not making sure, they at least, create a bit of an established stable environment for the child before breeding? This behaviour can be viewed or analysed as selfish.

Are they just ignorant of the consequences? Do they think not further than their noses? Because there are measures implemented to prevent this. There are contraceptives because it’s no longer the medieval era! Surely, they should utilize these resources so as to combat the cycle of poverty. The truth is, cutting down on the high levels of the breeding African shall certainly contribute a lot, towards the ending the cycle of poverty. These children do not deserve to be subjected to such in 2017.

It is about time, we engaged the matter from all angles. The stance is, Africans, please stop breeding while, you cannot afford the breeding lifestyle. If not for you, do it for the sanity of the unborn baby. The child does not have to be exposed to a growing up environment with high risk of physical and sexual abuse and undesirable living conditions. They do not have to bear that as their background in 2017. Let us cut down on the breeding.

Sane Sunyshine Sihiya is a professional Social Scientist, a liberal and feminist, who pushes for discourse that advances humanity.